Online Self Care Series

Holiday Self Care Series
Holiday Self Care Series

 

Start off the Season with Self Care

Join me in for my first ONLINE course: Holiday Self Care Series 

$49 for 5 weeks of classes you can reference each and every holiday season, or throughout the year!

**On your own time, in your own home**

What You Need to Know:

Videos will be released each Monday from November 26 to December 24th. You are able to download and save the videos to your computer for future viewing. Each video will be 45-60 minutes in length and include a minimum of 15 minutes of guided movement, breathwork and/or meditation.

Topics covered in this series will include:

– Week 1: Intro to Yoga for Self Care (Asana + Pranayama)
– Week 2: The Practice of Contentment
– Week 3: Loving Kindness + Mindfulness Meditation
– Week 4: Healthy Boundaries for Happiness
– Week 5: Off the Mat: Yoga for the Present

_____________________________________________

To Register:
1) Click the link below and pay $49 registration (<$10/class!)

www.paypal.me/amyinyoga

2) Wait to receive follow-up e-mail confirming your registration.

Didn’t receive an e-mail?
Reach out to me directly at
amy@ayearinyoga.com with any questions.

3) Optional: Join Secret Facebook Group for practitioners or receive e-mail links to download weekly videos

_____________________________________________

Not sure you’re ready to make the plunge? Contact info@ayearinyoga.com with questions or to learn more about upcoming class offerings!

Ready to Save Your Spot?

Get started by making payment to: www.paypal.me/amyinyoga

NEW! Yoga + Meditation Back to School

Hello All! (particularly SWFL friends)

Exciting News: Yoga and Meditation are going to back to school!

Fall 2018 STC schedule graphic.png

Join me for one or several five week courses in Yoga and/or Meditation at Suncoast Technical College in North Port OR Sarasota, FL to being Oct. 1st!

All courses are $49 for five weeks / classes.

Limited space and time to register!

Registration available here:

941-361-6590

or

https://sarasotacountyschools.net/schools/ace/

See “Course Catalog”

Located outside of SWFL and looking for a chance to dive deeper? Hang tight!

Online courses and additional trainings to come in 2019

Now Accepting Remote Clients!

In yoga black and white

Now Accepting Remote Clients!

Enjoy private customized yoga practice at home, on your own schedule.


Check out “First Dibs” deal below!
First 3 New Clients for A Year in Yoga private instruction save $1,000!

Give the Gift of Wellness for Mother’s Day!

Schedule private session here or e-mail: info@ayearinyoga.com

“First Dibs” A Year in Yoga Deposit

$250 deposit, refundable within 10 days minus 25% processing and administrative fee. Client will be contacted for confirmation and payment plan information within 3-4 days of initial deposit. A Year in Yoga Includes: 6 week Foundations Video Series Download (2 hours each) Bi Weekly On-site, Phone or Video Check-In’s Custom Practice or “Sadhana” Custom regular practice designed to meet your specific needs Journal Entries to monitor and measure progress Video Feedback (up to 12 videos) adjust and modify your practice as things arise in your life First 3 Clients (First Dibs): $1,999 / year Then: $2,999 6 months In Yoga: $1,499 / 6 months *Flexible payment plans available

$250.00

 

individual options 2018 1individual options 2018 2
Trouble reading the PDF? View here.

 



Get Away Weekend, In Mindfulness

Mindful Moments Retreat June 2018

Continue reading “Now Accepting Remote Clients!”

Mindful Moments On + Off the Mat

I am excited to announce my first “retreat” to be held at North Port Yoga + Wellness with friend and colleague, Gisela Bouvier, RDN, founder of Mindfully Intuitive Nutrition.

Join us for a memorable weekend immersion in yoga, mindfulness and nutrition. Find food freedom and learn to practice yoga on and off the mat. Discover peace of mind in all aspects of life.

Questions? Shoot me an email at amy@northportyoga.org

We hope to see you then!

Mindful Moments Retreat June 2018

Coming out of numbness

Coming out of numbness. What the fuck does that even mean? When we go through a period of intense emotional exertion and purging, our bodies and minds need time to recover. I won’t cite a text in support, but can tell you from a series of traumatic life-altering impulsive decisions passed, and from my current emerging circumstance, that loss and grief are real. It’s numbing. And surprisingly it’s noticeable; but only to those closest to you (and even this might surprise you).

Just because you’re a yogi doesn’t mean you don’t have hiccups (figuratively or literally). I make a lot of mistakes. I look back on my day and wonder if I came off differently than I intended. I’m insecure and cautious. But, being a yogi means that I walk through my day knowing that at the bottom of it all, there is a net to catch me. That I am someone who is just as important (and equally insignificant) as every other human being. I am valuable, I have a contribution to make. It’s a foundation in my heart that goes beyond friends and families, and formalities. In darkness, it’s easy to get lost; but the Self is a cheerleader, teacher, wise man and friend. The voice inside that says, “This will get better.” “Hang on a little longer.” The change in my life has been incessant for over three years now. From job to job to grad school to job, the only consistencies in my life – friends and relationships – have also largely dissipated. So there comes a time when we question ourselves; did I make the right decisions? To trust, to go forth, to give our energy in this particular direction?

I don’t regret a single decision I’ve made, because at that moment I thought it was the right one.

So, either I live with the consequences or I stay true to my impulses, perhaps revealing another side of myself. Life is about this journey, of mistakes and folly. Our only job in life is to follow it.

That’s where I’m devoting my attention now, to my present ever-evolving circumstance. With an awareness that a flow to life exists which I have no power over. Like a current, it sweeps us through life at its leisure, pulling against our selfish attempts to disembark, to choose our own direction driven by mind and matter rather than by heart (intuition). Taping into that foundation – the one I cultivate and continually find through the repetition of daily meditation – gives me a place to go, to remove myself from outside pressures to reside in nothing. It’s also in their songs, have you heard? Listen. The Beatles, John Lennon, Paul Simon, Bob Dylan to name a few. When we give up ourselves to creativity in any form, we give our minds over to the current trajectory of our lives. In Buddhism, this is called “right knowledge.”

Sometimes I find it difficult to reign it in, as they say, when my mind expands to a point of all-encompassing awareness. I can feel the cries abroad and here at home in my heart. And I know many others share this gift and torture. What can we do? Love our neighbor despite themselves. Be true to your values, and if you need inspiration google the Yamas and Niyamas; every religion hits upon these tenants in some form. No matter what you call them, they’re useful and important.

So that’s the take away. And in the meantime we will continue to explore what it is to emerge from numbness and isolation; regardless of your outward persona. Whenever you doubt, question or fear, know it is not you. We all suffer from the same vices, and the only way to emerge gracefully is to move harmoniously.

x Amy

Challenging Concepts of the “Western Yogi” Part III: Safe Spaces in Yoga

Part III: Safe Spaces in Yoga
By: Vivi Vallin, M.A.

I am currently in a yoga teacher training at a studio in East Los Angeles called People’s Yoga. They are the first yoga studio in this particular area of Los Angeles and are going to be celebrating their two-year anniversary in the coming weeks. People’s Yoga prides itself in making yoga accessible to the community of East Los Angeles. Classes are affordable, some are bilingual or in Spanish, there are classes for families to practice together, many of the instructors are people of color and the studio is accessible via public transportation. This year they offered their first 200-hour yoga teacher training. The others in my cohort are also people of color. All different backgrounds and ages but sharing the experience of what it is like to be a person of color who has been drawn to yoga on their own healing journey. As we learn about yoga together, we also share our experiences of feeling excluded, navigating being undocumented, being a queer person of color, how yoga is viewed by our families, and how we view injustices every day. We have a space in yoga to integrate our cultural and ethnic identities and experiences from that identity. This process is powerful.

On a personal level, I believe practicing yoga brings you closer and closer to your authentic self. Although yoga did not originate in Mexico, practicing yoga as a Mexican-American has brought me closer to my own culture’s healing practices, my roots, my history, and my family. I think this is because of yoga’s ability to cultivate self-awareness and self-love. In yoga, we embrace all parts of ourselves. From this space, I can see that a yoga practice brings individuals closer to who they really are. Each of us is unique. Our stories and experiences are unique. If we allow space to share and unite these stories, the experience of each of us will be richer and more full.

Black, white or brown (or however you identify) – we can all be united in our experiences of trauma, pain, sadness, joy, happiness, and gratitude. These are universal human emotions that link us together. We can heal together.  As we move toward this ideal, we still need to acknowledge that there is a need for safe spaces to heal for marginalized groups. It may look like a yoga studio that opens in East Los Angeles. It may look like a workshop about traditional Mexican healing practices. Each community should have the right to access safe spaces to provide wellness and healing, individually and together. Each community should have the right to choose the practices that will help them heal. Healing movements and leaders historically emerge from within their own community. In this case, as fellow brothers and sisters in color and among all throughout Los Angeles, our shared role is to respect and support this work for authentic and accurate cultural representation in any way we can.

BLACK YOGA TEACHERES ALLIANCE

When I heard about the Black Yoga Teachers Alliance (BYTA) I was excited and wanted to learn more about their work. The group was founded in 2008 and first began as a social media group. The goal was to create a safe space for teachers, students, practitioners, healers and enthusiasts to discuss yoga, share resources and create community. They wanted to create a place to explore the many paths and types of yoga, while also incorporating the authentic spirituality that black yoga teachers bring to the practice of yoga.

The BYTA provides their collective community with resources about teacher trainings, educational programs about yoga, scholarship opportunities and yoga publications. It also launched its first national initiative named Yoga as a Peace Practice: Redefining black lives and restoring peace and pride in our homes and communities. The initiative includes offering curriculum to yoga teachers so that they can take action by offering yoga, meditation practices and yoga based on lifestyle philosophies among those who are victims of violence (BYTA.com).

Since 2008, the group expanded and will be holding its first major retreat and conference in August 2016. The speakers being highlighted are black yoga instructors who have been leaders in this movement for a long time. The BYTA wants to celebrate and highlight these leaders that do not often get the recognition and space to share their wisdom and experience. The conference information describes that there will be an emphasis on the experience of being black in yoga and in this nation, as well as spaces to share and heal in community.

The Black Yoga Teacher Alliance currently has a Kickstarter Fundraiser organized by Jacoby Ballard of Third Root Community Center. The fundraiser aims to raise enough money to support 10 scholarships to black yogis who otherwise would not be able to attend the conference. A second goal of the campaign is to have 1000 white yogis donate to support the campaign. This would be a sign of support and send a powerful message that these types of safe spaces and events are important.

I donated to the BYTA scholarship fund because I support their efforts to create safe space for and to celebrate black yogis. They are not only sharing yoga but also leading the way with national initiatives that use the practice of yoga to engage with major issues such as violence and victims of violence, especially in black communities. I encourage those of you who are part of a yoga community to also support by donating to the scholarship fund, finding out more about the BYTA and/or attending the conference to learn more about their work first hand. Their efforts and contributions to the broader yoga community are valuable and are contributing to breaking stereotypes of exclusivity in mainstream yoga.

 

BYA logo

 

See what the Black Yoga Teachers Alliance is up to, get involved or donate here.
Photo Cred: BYTA.com

Challenging Concepts of the "Western Yogi" Part III: Safe Spaces in Yoga

Part III: Safe Spaces in Yoga
By: Vivi Vallin, M.A.

I am currently in a yoga teacher training at a studio in East Los Angeles called People’s Yoga. They are the first yoga studio in this particular area of Los Angeles and are going to be celebrating their two-year anniversary in the coming weeks. People’s Yoga prides itself in making yoga accessible to the community of East Los Angeles. Classes are affordable, some are bilingual or in Spanish, there are classes for families to practice together, many of the instructors are people of color and the studio is accessible via public transportation. This year they offered their first 200-hour yoga teacher training. The others in my cohort are also people of color. All different backgrounds and ages but sharing the experience of what it is like to be a person of color who has been drawn to yoga on their own healing journey. As we learn about yoga together, we also share our experiences of feeling excluded, navigating being undocumented, being a queer person of color, how yoga is viewed by our families, and how we view injustices every day. We have a space in yoga to integrate our cultural and ethnic identities and experiences from that identity. This process is powerful.

On a personal level, I believe practicing yoga brings you closer and closer to your authentic self. Although yoga did not originate in Mexico, practicing yoga as a Mexican-American has brought me closer to my own culture’s healing practices, my roots, my history, and my family. I think this is because of yoga’s ability to cultivate self-awareness and self-love. In yoga, we embrace all parts of ourselves. From this space, I can see that a yoga practice brings individuals closer to who they really are. Each of us is unique. Our stories and experiences are unique. If we allow space to share and unite these stories, the experience of each of us will be richer and more full.

Black, white or brown (or however you identify) – we can all be united in our experiences of trauma, pain, sadness, joy, happiness, and gratitude. These are universal human emotions that link us together. We can heal together.  As we move toward this ideal, we still need to acknowledge that there is a need for safe spaces to heal for marginalized groups. It may look like a yoga studio that opens in East Los Angeles. It may look like a workshop about traditional Mexican healing practices. Each community should have the right to access safe spaces to provide wellness and healing, individually and together. Each community should have the right to choose the practices that will help them heal. Healing movements and leaders historically emerge from within their own community. In this case, as fellow brothers and sisters in color and among all throughout Los Angeles, our shared role is to respect and support this work for authentic and accurate cultural representation in any way we can.

BLACK YOGA TEACHERES ALLIANCE

When I heard about the Black Yoga Teachers Alliance (BYTA) I was excited and wanted to learn more about their work. The group was founded in 2008 and first began as a social media group. The goal was to create a safe space for teachers, students, practitioners, healers and enthusiasts to discuss yoga, share resources and create community. They wanted to create a place to explore the many paths and types of yoga, while also incorporating the authentic spirituality that black yoga teachers bring to the practice of yoga.

The BYTA provides their collective community with resources about teacher trainings, educational programs about yoga, scholarship opportunities and yoga publications. It also launched its first national initiative named Yoga as a Peace Practice: Redefining black lives and restoring peace and pride in our homes and communities. The initiative includes offering curriculum to yoga teachers so that they can take action by offering yoga, meditation practices and yoga based on lifestyle philosophies among those who are victims of violence (BYTA.com).

Since 2008, the group expanded and will be holding its first major retreat and conference in August 2016. The speakers being highlighted are black yoga instructors who have been leaders in this movement for a long time. The BYTA wants to celebrate and highlight these leaders that do not often get the recognition and space to share their wisdom and experience. The conference information describes that there will be an emphasis on the experience of being black in yoga and in this nation, as well as spaces to share and heal in community.

The Black Yoga Teacher Alliance currently has a Kickstarter Fundraiser organized by Jacoby Ballard of Third Root Community Center. The fundraiser aims to raise enough money to support 10 scholarships to black yogis who otherwise would not be able to attend the conference. A second goal of the campaign is to have 1000 white yogis donate to support the campaign. This would be a sign of support and send a powerful message that these types of safe spaces and events are important.

I donated to the BYTA scholarship fund because I support their efforts to create safe space for and to celebrate black yogis. They are not only sharing yoga but also leading the way with national initiatives that use the practice of yoga to engage with major issues such as violence and victims of violence, especially in black communities. I encourage those of you who are part of a yoga community to also support by donating to the scholarship fund, finding out more about the BYTA and/or attending the conference to learn more about their work first hand. Their efforts and contributions to the broader yoga community are valuable and are contributing to breaking stereotypes of exclusivity in mainstream yoga.

 

BYA logo

 

See what the Black Yoga Teachers Alliance is up to, get involved or donate here.
Photo Cred: BYTA.com

My Year in Yoga

Sometimes following your dream means going down the unpaved road. The challenge is to trust that what awaits you at the end of the road is far beyond your wildest expectations. From a fellow traveler, do trust. You won’t be disappointed.

Those who know me well are well aware that the past year has been a little bit – or, a lot a bit – out of the ordinary. Moving to California was one thing, but forfeiting my career in government affairs, vowing to take up Yoga Studies, and accepting a graduate assistantship in religion and ecology – I think it’s safe to say I may have lost a few people along the way. But that’s okay, because my new venture is all about awareness. My love affair with yoga has thus far centered around my own growth and discernment, facing the harsh realities of post-college life and working them out on my mat. Through my five years of regular asana practice (or the physical practice of sequenced yoga postures as we all know them) I’ve found more self-confidence, focus and ambition than I ever imagined possible. In short, I believe my regular yoga practice has put me on the fast-track to becoming the best version of myself, and with this comes an overwhelming sense of contentment, and happiness. Goodbye fears, insecurities, and anxiety! Hello fabulous and all authentic me! It takes consistency, but pays off 100 fold. I’m in the best shape of my life, I’m the happiest I’ve ever been and I’m pursuing my dreams in a way I never could have imagined: by obtaining a Masters of Arts in Yoga Studies degree from Loyola Marymount University (LMU).

Now I want to give a disclaimer, because I realize in my very introduction I’ve painted myself as an over-enthusiastic (perhaps unstable), yoga obsessed 25-year old – nothing too original about that. But what is unique is that my journey in Yoga Studies has begun, and will continue, in unadulterated openness. I was drawn to the M.A. of Yoga Studies program and to LMU for their explicit over-arching mission for universal acceptance. If you don’t already know, LMU is a very catholic university. But the mission of this program is to explore commonalities of diverse religions – Hinduism, Buddhism, Christianity – to uncover the historical emergence, and contemporary significance of yoga. I don’t think there’s one way to find happiness, contentment, and a trim physique in this life. There are many. And people are unique, and deserve infinite opportunities to explore themselves and their interests to find their own path to obtaining these things. I do believe, however, that yoga is a powerful tool in this pursuit; the actual benefits of which have yet to be thoroughly researched and documented under the scrutiny of Western culture. While mainstream society begins to embrace the proven health benefits of yoga in hospitals and doctor’s offices throughout the country (woop, woop!), there is still more. I believe yoga has extensive socio-economic benefits through which yoga can fundamentally empower and transform individuals to do better for themselves and their families, despite perceived limitations of background or circumstance. This means: raising families above the poverty line, rehabilitating troubled or imprisoned youth, eliminating social side effects of mental illness, inspiring decision-makers to better serve the public and our environment, increasing the number of minorities in public office, and the list goes on…At a time when our country and our world are imploding with violence and chaos, and our leaders have proven ineffective to assuage the storm, I believe this awareness holds the key to restoring individual contentment and promoting universal acceptance in the U.S. and across the globe.

So, here I am, a part French-Canadian/part English/all-American Westerner devoting my life to Yoga Studies to explore just that. I want to give you the proof you’re looking for, that yoga is valuable to you and the people you love, beyond a 60-minute destress session and the potentiality for six-pack abs (although these aren’t bad side effects either). Armed with a B.A. in Public Advocacy, several years of government affairs work in the public and private sector, a published manuscript on the socio-economics of gender disparity, and a new endeavor as Assistant Editor for an academic journal in global religions and social ecology, I won’t let you down. (And I hope you’ll check back for small bits of enlightenment I discover along the way.) Challenge accepted.

I look forward to sharing and always appreciate your thoughts and reflections.

Keep on flowing xx

Amy